Burren walks-Fanore to Caherdoonerish ring fort

Last Sunday we joined a walk organized by Burrenbeo, a volunteer group that describes itself as a landscape charity. We me at St Joseph's church in Fanore, and from there, walked the old cattle road, today known as the green road towards Blackhead. The green road runs parallel to the coast road, nearly all the way to Ballyvaughan.

Mary from Burrenbeo explains the geology of the Burren

 One of the many Hawthorn bushes along the road. 

One of the many Hawthorn bushes along the road. 

After about 1.5 hrs we reached Caherdonnerish ring fort, which is located half way up the mountain, on a rock plateau overlooking Galway Bay. The fort was built between 500-900 AD.

 The outer walls of the fort are still in good condition. 

The outer walls of the fort are still in good condition. 

 The inside of the fort, a section of wall that's still intact. Other sections of the interior have collapsed over time.

The inside of the fort, a section of wall that's still intact. Other sections of the interior have collapsed over time.

Its a shame, that neither the green road or the ring fort itself are sign posted. There is no sign in Fanore to point hikers to the trail head, the ring fort itself is only mentioned in specialist travel guides. 

 Late afternoon sun over Galway bay, as seen from Caherdoonish.

Late afternoon sun over Galway bay, as seen from Caherdoonish.

The best time to go up to Caherdoonerish is probably the afternoon, the view of the sun setting over Galway Bay and the Aran islands alone is worth the climb.

 The green road leads through farm land, so expect to meet livestock on the way. 

The green road leads through farm land, so expect to meet livestock on the way. 



Source: www.burrenbeo.com